Little Sister Meets The Mouse

mouse-sister

 

I remember hearing that the best way to catch a mouse was to shine a light in its eyes, which would paralyze the critter thus making it easy capture. Supposedly, this was more efficient than a mousetrap.

One night my parents went out for the evening leaving my sisters and I home by ourselves. Being the oldest I took delight in involving them in some unplanned mischief (ok some of it was planned).

This evening was dull and boring until we heard a noise in the kitchen. Imaginations ran wild but I was the one who checked it out. Peeking into the kitchen I saw a mouse run across the floor and hide under the refrigerator.

I called my sisters to come and help. The older one took one look, screamed, and jumped onto the table before anyone could blink. Her scream was so horrific that the mouse nearly died of fear. I thought my sister had ruined my adventure but when I checked under the fridge the little mouse was still there smiling at me.

My youngest sister got a clothes hanger and straightened it and I found the flashlight. I handed her the flashlight with instructions to shine it in the mouse’s eyes while I slowly inched the hanger towards the mouse. Everything was going fine until my sister moved the light. The mouse decided it had had enough and ran straight towards her and she dropped the light and jumped on the table to scream with her sister. The mouse got away and lived to tell the story to its children.

This story has been shared many times by our family and all the grand kids have heard it and still laugh. Sharing family stories is a valuable way for us to help our children understand that their parents were once kids and also did dumb things. Telling stories about ourselves helps our children realize they are alright and can learn and grow from their mistakes just as their parents did.


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Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

Can you think of something silly or sweet or cute or just plain crazy that your child has done? 

Tell them the story, and then tell them again.  Just as family photo albums preserve family memories, telling and re-telling stories about our children and their antics, their triumphs, and, very carefully and with great sensitivity, even their missteps and how they overcame them, creates a strong family narrative.  Maybe you’ll decide to take it even one step further and write these stories down or help your child write them down or illustrate them.

Whether or not you write them down, make it a tradition for your kids to hear you say, “Remember when ___________ .”

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Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

Can you think of something silly or sweet or cute or just plain crazy that your child has done? 

Tell them the story, and then tell them again.  Just as family photo albums preserve family memories, telling and re-telling stories about our children and their antics, their triumphs, and, very carefully and with great sensitivity, even their missteps and how they overcame them, creates a strong family narrative.  Maybe you’ll decide to take it even one step further and write these stories down or help your child write them down or illustrate them.

Whether or not you write them down, make it a tradition for your kids to hear you say, “Remember when ___________ .”