“Live to Live or Live to Die”
–The Jed Nield Story

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Jed Nield is a man who has earned my respect. He is a rodeo competitor (a team roper), a father of four children, and manager of a 13,000-acre ranch in Idaho.

Why is Jed so impressive to me? After all he is not the only person with these attributes, and in fact there are probably hundreds of cowboys in this country who fit this description, but, in my opinion, he stands out from them all.

On January 29, 2007, he was working alone in a remote area of a phosphate mine, doing some drilling and blasting. On this particular day Jed suffered an industrial accident that changed his life and his family’s life forever.

As he was drilling, he encountered a problem with the drill and decided to fix it without turning it off. Unfortunately, his clothes got caught in the drill, which pulled him into it and spun him around at 114 RPMs. Finally, his clothing ripped and he was thrown free.

This accident cost him his arm and eventually his leg. He had the presence of mind to use his cell phone to call for help (which miraculously worked in an area where it usually does not). The doctors attribute his life being saved to this call and the cold, which caused the bleeding to slow down.

From this accident Jed developed a personal philosophy for life, a philosophy that could benefit us all. Jed has chosen to live his post-accident life “living to live, not living to die.”  He has not let the loss of an arm and leg, countless surgeries, and pain stop him.

Even though he only has one arm and one leg he doesn’t consider himself disabled. He has a positive attitude, and is more grateful than ever for being alive, being able to work, and being a husband, father, and grandfather.

Parents can help their children embrace their challenges and grow stronger as they face them. Let’s help them to be grateful for who they are and encourage them to adopt a “live to live” philosophy.

 


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Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

It’s all about balance.

When your child brings up something they don’t have that they want, spend a couple of minutes talking about how nice it would be to have that thing, that new bike, new friend, chance to go ___________ or do ___________.

Acknowledge their hope and desire.

There is nothing wrong with wanting more or dreaming big.  The problem comes when we focus too much on what we DON’T HAVE and not enough on gratitude for what we DO HAVE.  Help them BALANCE their focus by spending at least as much energy on being truly mindful of and grateful for what they do have as they spend wishing for what they don’t have.  Sometimes it can help to walk outside together and look up at the sky and focus for one full minute on being grateful for being alive and part of this beautiful world and having a chance today to “live to live.”

6 Comments

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    Pamela Brown Lish on December 1, 2015 at 2:59 am

    I remember Jed and when this happened. Jeds mom was my mom’s visiting teacher and reported to her on his condition. I was always amazed of his faith and determination. I am glad to see his life is going on in such a positive way. We could all take a lesson from him. Best wishes, Pam lish

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    Noemi (Buccheri) on December 1, 2015 at 4:03 am

    Jed, I had not heard that you lost your arm and your leg, I am sorry!, You are such an inspiration to so many people, I had the pleasure to work with you at the mine, you always were so helpful and you have a Great family!! what an amazing story… the example you always set in everything you did I will always remember that.. Best wishes!! Noemi, Brenda, Melissa, Ruben, and Ryan

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    Danny Walton on December 1, 2015 at 4:28 am

    Jed is a great example to all. His attitude towards life and to God are amazing.

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    Chuck and Dawn Loyd on December 1, 2015 at 2:21 pm

    Yes, he is a get example to all of us to not give up. I love his positive attitude and his love for life.

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    Rick hillstead on December 1, 2015 at 10:01 pm

    Jed is one of my best friends. I have nothing but the most respect and admiration for this man.

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    Duane Perry on December 2, 2015 at 5:27 pm

    Great story and comments. Thanks for sharing. You’re great, my friend.

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Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

It’s all about balance.

When your child brings up something they don’t have that they want, spend a couple of minutes talking about how nice it would be to have that thing, that new bike, new friend, chance to go ___________ or do ___________.

Acknowledge their hope and desire.

There is nothing wrong with wanting more or dreaming big.  The problem comes when we focus too much on what we DON’T HAVE and not enough on gratitude for what we DO HAVE.  Help them BALANCE their focus by spending at least as much energy on being truly mindful of and grateful for what they do have as they spend wishing for what they don’t have.  Sometimes it can help to walk outside together and look up at the sky and focus for one full minute on being grateful for being alive and part of this beautiful world and having a chance today to “live to live.”