Keep on the Sunny Side of the Street

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A few weeks ago I attended a musical program with my father and his wife at their care center. One of the songs the performers sang was called “Keep on the Sunny Side,” The song was beautiful and the words inspiring so I did a Google search to learn more about its genesis.

Ada Blenkhorn wrote the lyrics in 1899. Her inspiration was her disabled nephew who was confined to a wheelchair. He enjoyed going outside and always wanted to be pushed on “the sunny side” of the street. Nearly 30 years after she wrote the lyrics, the Carter family popularized the song.

The first verse and chorus are full of hope and advice for successful living.*

 

Verse 1

There’s a dark and a troubled side of life;
There’s a bright and a sunny side, too;
Tho’ we meet with the darkness and strife,
The sunny side we also may view.

Chorus

Keep on the sunny side, always on the sunny side,
Keep on the sunny side of life;
It will help us every day, it will brighten all the way,
If we keep on the sunny side of life.

 

How much would your life change if you focused more on the “sunny side of life?”  I know mine would, and for the better.

*To read the other verses go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keep_On_the_Sunny_Side


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Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

Such an inspiring image here of a boy who didn’t let his disability keep him on the dark side of life.  Optimism is something that we learn.  One way we learn it is by practicing hoping we can do things that are hard and taking the risk to try. 
  • If your child is afraid to try something, help them practice.
  • Rehearse doing hard things with them, even little things like asking someone over to play or talking to a teacher about an assignment they don’t understand.
  •  Assure them that if their first plan doesn’t work out, you will help them find another way.
  • Tell them about the hard things you want to try to do and let them watch you plan and practice, take a chance, and sometimes succeed on the first try, sometimes have to try again and maybe again.
As you do this you will create a strong family culture of hope and optimism.

Anne's Corner

By Anne Evans-Cazier, LCSW

Such an inspiring image here of a boy who didn’t let his disability keep him on the dark side of life.  Optimism is something that we learn.  One way we learn it is by practicing hoping we can do things that are hard and taking the risk to try. 
  • If your child is afraid to try something, help them practice.
  • Rehearse doing hard things with them, even little things like asking someone over to play or talking to a teacher about an assignment they don’t understand.
  •  Assure them that if their first plan doesn’t work out, you will help them find another way.
  • Tell them about the hard things you want to try to do and let them watch you plan and practice, take a chance, and sometimes succeed on the first try, sometimes have to try again and maybe again.
As you do this you will create a strong family culture of hope and optimism.